e-book A Call to Action: Women, Religion, Violence, and Power

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A Call to Action

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President Jimmy Carter On "A Call to Action: Women, Religion, Violence, and Power"

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President Carter Call to Action - Promoting the Rights of Women and Girls

Marshal the efforts of women officeholders and first ladies, and encourage involvement of prominent civilian women in correcting abuses. Induce individual nations to elevate the end of human trafficking to a top priority, as they did to end slavery in the nineteenth century. Help remove commanding officers from control over cases of sexual abuse in the military so that professional prosecutors can take action.

Apply title IX protection for women students and evolve laws and procedures in all nations to reduce the plague of sexual abuse on university campuses. Include women's rights specifically in new U. Millennium Development Goals. Expose and condemn infanticide of baby girls and selective abortion of female fetuses. Explore alternatives to battered women's shelters, such as installing GPS locators on male abusers, and make police reports of spousal abuse mandatory. Strengthen U. Increase training of midwives and other health workers to provide care at birth. Help scholars working to clarify religious beliefs on protecting women's rights and nonviolence, and give activists and practitioners access to such training resources.

Insist that the U. Encourage more qualified women to seek public office, and support them. Recruit influential men to assist in gaining equal rights for women.

Adopt the Swedish model by prosecuting pimps, brothel owners, and male customers, not the prostitutes. Publicize and implement U. Security Resolution , which encourages the participation of women in peace efforts. Security Resolution , which condemns the use of sexual violence as a tool of war.

Condemn and outlaw honor killings. May 19, Jordan rated it really liked it.

Table of Contents

Jimmy Carter's latest book is a powerful examination of the ways that our culture, and cultures around the world, subjugate women to a lesser, underpaid, underprivileged, and dangerous position. Starting with his childhood in the deep South, Carter takes readers through his own spiritual awakening to women's issues in the context of Christianity and other world religions, and then transitions us into political issues of his terms as governor and president. The ongoing global issues facing women Jimmy Carter's latest book is a powerful examination of the ways that our culture, and cultures around the world, subjugate women to a lesser, underpaid, underprivileged, and dangerous position.

The ongoing global issues facing women comprise the latter half of the book, including disease, abuse, wages, genital mutilation, rape, forced marriage, and just about every human right you can think of. A startling, but necessary read.

I knocked my initial rating down a few stars, because there were a few moments, starting around Chapters and continuing through the end of the book, where I feel that Carter loses track of the pertinence of women's issues to instead pat himself on the back for the Carter Center. I agree with Carter that the Carter Center has accomplished some incredible feats, and I am happy to read about them.

But, I feel the danger of this focus is to portray an issue as resolved, when in reality, we aren't even close. I finished a few chapters with a greater sense of what the Carter Center is up to than of what is going on in the lives of women globally. I'm also wary of Carter's Christianity. In general, I can accept his religiosity because I feel that it is nuanced, balanced, and accepting of other cultures and belief systems.

However, at times, he seems to purport Christianity as taming the "savage" anti-women notions of African and Islamic cultures, which seems inaccurate and dangerous to me. In describing treatments of disease in Africa, Carter links female doctors to their missionaries and religious backgrounds; it's as if to say, African people are compelled to Christianity because another female human has taken an interest in their health, and they will soon embody the power of Christ and gender-balanced Christianity.